Photographer
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Véro Dubé

Photojournalist from Montreal, Canada.

Photo: The Sahara Desert, Morocco.

Vince

Every year, almost one million people die from suicide; a “global” mortality rate of 16 per 100,000, or one death every 40 seconds. Worldwide, suicide ranks among the three leading causes of death among those aged 15–44. Suicide accounts for more loss of life in the world than the total number of deaths from war, acts of terrorism and homicide combined.

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Inside European Homes: Natascha

We sat by the pool and slowly got to know each other. You know how most of us usually make an effort to please others, especially when we meet them for the first time? Well, Natascha isn’t one of those people; she’s always being 100% true to herself, whether you like it or not. I mean, if she doesn’t think you’re funny, then she just won’t laugh at your jokes, period. Yeah, she’s that kind of straightforward. And although some may think it’s intimidating, I thought it was pretty damn powerful of her to grab life by the horns with such boldness.

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Inside European Homes: Petra

One evening in November of 2016, I was staying at Ole Ole Ollie, a hostel in the Balinese surf town of Canggu. It was hot as hell and the humidity was killing me. I headed to the air-conditioned dorm to cool down for a bit. That’s when I met Petra for the first time. She had just gotten out of the shower and she was unpacking her bag, one towel wrapped around her hair and another one around her body.

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Inside European Homes: Zareena

In my last Inside European Homes article, I explained how the Internet can take you to unexpected places and make you cross paths with faraway people. We’re all too familiar now with the power of Facebook or Instagram, but what about the dating scene? Yes, this is a story about love! And no, I didn’t date Zareena… but my brother did!

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Inside European Homes: Marie & Sébastien

I walked from the bus stop to the nearest metro station looking like a total novice: that is, carrying way too many bags, swearing at my phone because Google Maps kept lagging, and stopping at McDonald's for a quick dinner. #classy. A burger and 13 subway stops later, I found Marie and Sébastien’s apartment building. I typed in the code they had given me to open the main door and started slowly going up the staircase. Of course, their place had to be on the highest floor, so I got there all sweaty and out of breath, ready to make a brilliant first impression.

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Inside European Homes: Mathieu

On May 4th, I took a flight from Marrakesh, Morocco, and landed in Bordeaux, France, in the afternoon. A few minutes later, I picked up my suitcase and exited the airport. Mathieu was there, nonchalantly waiting for me, wearing his French beret and holding a box of burnt canelés (a variety of crème brûlée that is typical to the Bordeaux area). After casually greeting each other, we walked to the parking lot, where he pretended to be in control of the situation until I noticed he simply couldn’t figure out where he’d parked his car. Ten minutes later, we were on our way to Capbreton, a city located on the Western coast of France, about 50 km north of the Spanish border.

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From Burning Man to Morocco

“You noticed how the Moroccan architecture is all turned inward? For example, when you walk in the Medina, everything appears to be old and a bit crappy, right? But then, when you step foot inside some of these places, you may get extremely surprised and come face to face with luxurious riads [large traditional houses built around a central courtyard]. Well, same goes for the Moroccan people. We’re generally not the kind to show off, but rather keep the best sides of who we are for those we trust in.”

- Hamza

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The Indian Shock

When the sun sets on the horizon and the sky turns pink, it's like we’re in a Western movie, except that we’re riding a scooter instead of horses. We have the road to ourselves and I would never have thought it possible to feel so isolated from the rest of the world in the second most populous country on the planet.

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The Himalayan Journey – Day 8: What's Next, Véro?

On the way to the bus station, I’m stopped twice at different checkpoints, where they verify both my permits, and copy all my personal details in their inventory. When they stamp my documents and manually write down today’s date in the “exit date” field, it feels like they’re confirming to me that I made it out alive after all. For the first time since the beginning of this journey, I feel proud of myself. Proud for not giving up even when I felt like it was too much and, most importantly, proud for accomplishing one of my biggest dreams ever: trekking the mystical and prestigious Himalayas.

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The Himalayan Journey - Day 7: The Ghost Village

If I thought Tadapani was a boring village, it’s just because I'd never come to Ghorepani before. It may be a lot bigger, but it’s so dead it feels even more uninhabited. As I walk the stairs all the way up to the fourth floor, I have a feeling of déjà vu. Then I realize it's simply because this charming place reminds of the Adam’s family mansion. The electricity keeps cutting off, the floors are squeaking, the long and dark corridors all look haunted, and obviously, it's freezing cold here. Just another normal day in a Himalayan village. 

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The Himalayan Journey – Day 6: The Tuna Pizza

Another sleepless night, another sunrise, and another oat porridge later, we're back at it again. Today, we’re embarking on a new journey: the Poon Hill trek. It’s one of Nepal’s most touristy trails; it has a low difficulty level and can be completed in only three or four days. After ABC, this sounds like a walk in the park to me. You fool, Véro!

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The Himalayan Journey – Day 4: The White Stormy Desert

With all the elements spinning full speed around me, I lose grip. My guide disappears in front of me, and suddenly, I’m all alone in the storm. That’s when I stop being conscious of everything surrounding me and let my mind drift to a warm summer night in Montreal. Floral dress, platform sandals, loose hair, I’m walking on Mont Royal, smiling at the dozens of tipsy people having drinks on the many terraces of the avenue. I’m on my way to meet with the guy I like. I’m happy.

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The Himalayan Journey – Day 3: Fast-Paced, my Ass!

Okay, don’t panic Véro. I spit on the ground and analyze what comes out (sorry for the details): it’s neither coloured nor rusty. All good. And now that I think about it, we’re only at 2400 m; I’ve been at higher altitudes many times before. Maybe I’m just tired. I get up and we continue walking, but much slower.

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The Himalayan Journey – Day 2: The New Guy

Why am I doing this again? Am I even having fun? Never have I felt so powerless and weak in my entire life. All I want to do is cry, but that requires a bit of energy and I don’t have any at the moment. Then, all of a sudden, a ray of orange light pierces through the dark clouds and illuminates part of the sky. It only lasts a minute, but it’s enough to give me the strength to shed a tear. I realize I’m not crying because I’m desperate, no; I’m crying because this is so much more than I could’ve ever imagined it to be. It’s going to be hell of a journey.

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The Himalayan Journey – Day 1: Holy Shit!

It’s 8:30 and here I am, alone on an empty road surrounded by mountains, facing a long series of rock stairs. So…this is it? I don’t know why, but I expected the starting point to be a place packed with enthusiastic trekkers, a lot of noise, and full of positive energy. But it feels more like an abandoned trail in the middle of a ghost town if you ask me. Well, might as well start now.

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The Himalayan Journey - The Beginning

At midnight, I’m lying down on my bed with eyes wide open. What the hell did I get myself into? I haven’t trained for this and I don’t even have a guide. This is not your usual Sunday afternoon trek in Tremblant, it’s the freaking Himalayas. I try to shut my inner voice off, but deep down, I can feel something big is about to happen.

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The Natural Beauties of South-East Asia

Back in 2010, I spent over 3 months backpacking throughout South-East Asia. I remember being impressed by the ridiculous amount of electricity cables in the streets and feeling amused whenever I would see rat or snake on a menu. This time around, these particularities seem to be part of a much bigger picture. Indeed, my attention is directed more towards the natural beauties surrounding the people and its culture. Here are a few of my favorite spots so far: 

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